2018 Year In Review – Softaculous Auto Installer

Happy New Year from all of us at Softaculous !!

As we enter 2019, we would like to highlight some of the major changes that happened with Softaculous in 2018. It was a wonderful year at Softaculous and we are confident 2019 will be much bigger with several new features coming up in this year.

Major Changes in Softaculous in 2018

  1. Added 21 New Scripts: Some of the recent scripts we added include Hubzilla, IceHrm, WBCE CMS, Directus, Framadate, eLabFTW, Plikli CMS, Leafpub, Xibo, Atlantis CMS. Checkout the complete list here.
  2. 1307 Script Updates: With our commitment to keep our scripts library updated we released the updates for most of scripts on the same day when the script vendor released the update. Check out the complete list here.
  3. Added Staging option: This feature can be used to create a staging environment of your production website and test any changes you need. You can then Push these changes (files, database structure, database data) to your production website using the Push To Live option. You can refer to the Staging guide and Push to Live guide.
  4. Backup to Google Drive: You can now backup your website directly to your Google Drive account. You can refer to the Backup to Google Drive guide.
  5. WordPress Auto Upgrade Major/Minor branch: Users can now configure if they would like to auto upgrade their WordPress installations only to Minor versions or even upgrade to Major versions.
  6. WordPress Plugins and Themes Upgrade: Several improvements were made to the auto upgrade for WordPress Plugins and Themes which include checking for upgrades once every 24 hours.
  7. Added Quick Install option: Want to install scripts quickly ? This feature saves your time in configuring advanced options for a script and lets you install with minimal options and using default values for other options.
  8. Changed Password encryption to OpenSSL: Previously Softaculous used mcrypt for encrypting passwords which is Deprecated in PHP 7 hence we have moved to new password encryption method using OpenSSL. The existing passwords have been re-hashed.
  9. Support for PHP 7.1 and 7.2: With PHP community releasing new branches faster than ever, we have made changes in Softaculous to support all the latest versions of PHP. We also made structure changes in Softaculous to make sure Softaculous works fine when you upgrade the 3rd party PHP version.
  10. Better handling for Outdated Scripts: Softaculous now displays a notice on the script install page for scripts that have not been updated for more than 2 years (by the script vendor) so that the user knows that there has been no updates since two years for this script and make a wise decision if they want to install such script.

We would like to Thank all our clients for showing confidence in our products. We appreciate your business with us and assure you that we will deliver more features and enhancements in 2019

Regards,
The Softaculous Team

Optimize your server for high traffic WordPress installation

If you run a high traffic WordPress installation you will want to optimize WordPress and your server to run as efficiently as possible. This article gives a general overview of the avenues to pursue. It’s not a detailed technical explanation of each aspect.

WordPress Logo

The optimization techniques available to you will depend on your hosting setup. This article is divided into categories according to hosting type.

1) Shared Hosting :

This is the most common type of hosting. Your site will be hosted on a server along with many others. The hosting company manages the web server for you, so you have very little control over server settings and so on. The areas most relevant to this type of hosting are :

  • Caching : WordPress caching is the fastest way to improve performance. Plugins like W3 Total Cache or WP Super Cache can be easily installed and will cache your WordPress posts and pages as static files. These static files are then served to users, reducing the processing load on the server. This can improve performance several hundred times over for fairly static pages.
  • WordPress Performance : The first and easiest way to improve WordPress performance is plugins. Deactivate and delete any unnecessary plugins. Try selectively disabling plugins to measure server performance. Is one of your plugins significantly affecting your site’s performance?
    Then you can look at optimizing plugins. Are plugins coded inefficiently? Do they repeat unnecessary database queries? WordPress has its own caching system, so generally speaking, using functions like get_option(), update_option() and so on will be faster than writing SQL.

2) Virtual / Dedicated Server :

In this hosting scenario you have control over your own server. The server might be a dedicated piece of hardware or one of many virtual servers sharing the same physical hardware. The key thing is, you have control over the server settings. In addition to the areas above Caching and WordPress performance, you can follow the below techniques to optimize your server :

  • Server Optimization :

    DNS: If you host your DNS on external servers this will reduce the load on your primary web server. It’s a simple change, but it will offload some traffic and cpu load.

    Web Server: Your web server can be configured to increase performance. There are a range of techniques from web server caching to setting cache headers to reduce load per visitor. Search for your specific web server optimizations (for example, search for “apache optimization” for more info).

    PHP: There are various PHP accelerators available which can dramatically improve performance of your PHP files. This will apply to all PHP files, not just your WordPress installation. Search for PHP optimization for more information, f.e. APC.

    MySQL: MySQL optimization is a black art in itself. A few simple changes to the query cache settings can have a dramatic effect on WordPress performance because WordPress repeats a lot of queries on every request. Search for mysql optimization for more.

  • Offloading :

    Static Content : Any static files can be offloaded to another server. For example, any static images, JavaScript or CSS files can be moved to a different server. This is a common technique in very high performance systems (Google, Flickr, YouTube, etc) but can also be helpful for smaller sites where a single server is struggling. Also, moving this content onto different hostnames can lay the groundwork for multiple servers in the future.Some web servers are optimized to serve static files and can do so far more efficiently than more complex web servers like Apache, for example publicfile or lighttpd.

    Multiple Hostnames : There can also be user improvements by splitting static files between multiple hostnames. Most browser will only make 2 simultaneous requests to a server, so if you page requires 16 files they will be requested 2 at a time. If you spread that between 4 host names they will be requested 8 at a time. This can reduce page loading times for the user, but it can increase server load by creating more simultaneous requests. Also, known is “pipelining” can often saturate the visitor’s internet connection if overused.

    Offloading images is the easiest and simplest place to start. All images files could be evenly split between three hostnames (assets1.yoursite.com, assets2.yoursite.com, assets3.yoursite.com for example). As traffic grows, these hostnames could be moved to your own server. Note: Avoid picking a hostname at random as this will affect browser caching and result in more traffic and may also create excessive DNS lookups which do carry a performance penalty.

    Likewise any static JavaScript and CSS files can be offloaded to separate hostnames or servers.

Source : http://codex.wordpress.org